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This 3d render of the Jeremiah Lee Mansion is a part of a large project featuring the entire outside of the building. The main goal of the project was to recreate the look of the mansion the way it was originally built in 1768. This made photorealism difficult to achieve because one very critical component had to be removed. Namely, it was undesirable to add any signs of aging to the building, which is precisely what makes it much easier to achieve realism. It is always best to add some grunge, wear and rust to your render. To make up for this I tried outputting some renders as old photographs. This made the images more recognizable as photographs. After all, when we talk about photorealism it does not mean that the style of the photos we are trying to emulate is modern DSLR images.

The two main differences from the building’s current state are the balustrade and the glazing pattern of the semi-round window in the attic. A replica of the original window is still preserved inside the building. As for the balustrade, its configuration is completely unknown, but it is an established fact that it was removed by the 1850s.

You can see more of my photography and 3d art on Shutterstock.

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redlionIt is a well-known fact that there is a Red Lion pub or inn in nearly every town of the British Isles. This one is my personal favorite. It can be found in Avebury, a very unusual town that was build around (and through!) an ancient megalithic site which predates Stonehenge. As a matter of fact, this site is now managed by the same group that manages Stonehenge, but the Avebury stones are much more accessible and not as frequented by tourists. This may change eventually, but so far the atmosphere in Avebury is quite serene.

Interestingly, there is no intrinsic significance to the symbol of the red lion. A common heraldic device, the lion simply takes us back to the times when most folks were illiterate and signs  for such establishments were mostly pictorial.

See also Shutterstock.com

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The Devil's DareThis book has been in the works for the past two years and I am quite pleased with how it turned out. If the novel gets traction I will be writing two sequels to finalize the story, but the book reads very well as a standalone publication.

The monastery of St. Sebastian is safely tucked away from the turmoil of the early 14th century. What dangers could possibly await Conrad, a young novice preparing to join this community of devout monks? A simple act of kindness and duty turns his life upside down. Uprooted and confused, Conrad must risk everything for a cause that has not yet been revealed to him. He can only count on the help from a reclusive hermit, whom everybody else mistrusts and fears. Is Conrad ready to face the challenges of spiritual strife?

Buy The Devil’s Dare at Amazon US
Buy The Devil’s Dare at Amazon UK

Official trailer for The Devil’s Dare:

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Official trailer for The Devil’s Dare by A. A. Grishin:

This video features some imagery easily identifiable if you read the novel.

Buy The Devil’s Dare at Amazon US
Buy The Devil’s Dare at Amazon UK

 

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shot from a cannon during a Civil War reenactment

This image is cropped from a larger photo. I could have gotten closer, but not too much. In case you are wondering, there is no projectile used, but this is still dangerous. Even though this Confederate cannon is not likely to explode when there is no cannon ball used precautions must be taken. I heard of a case when a man lost his hand while loading the charge into the barrel that was not properly prepped. Some embers were still smoldering. And yes, it is loud.

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view_from_Central_Park_NY

Shutterstock wanted me to provide property releases for this photo. Not going to happen. Too bad though, because this image would work great in combination with some graph style arrow going above the roofs. To illustrate potential sales increase or some such thing.

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halberd_wm

Halberd was perfected as a weapon during the 14th and 15th centuries. A group of soldiers armed with halberds would have been the most unpleasant sight for a mounted knight. This multi-faceted blade is still used as a ceremonial weapon, especially by the Vatican guard.

Full resolution image of this halberd is available at Shutterstock.com

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antique_clock

I did not attempt to identify this old clock. From the looks of it, this mantle time keeping device combines elements of late 18th century design with some Romanticist features. The main figure appears to be that of a hunter or a traveler. He is perhaps looking at the clock’s face and pondering the fleeting nature of time.

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Legends of the Knights Templar
at Amazon.com
Legends of the Knights Templar at Amazon.co.uk
Legends of the Knights Templar at Amazon.com.au
Legends of the Knights Templar at Amazon.de
Legends of the Knights Templar at BarnesAndNoble.com
Legends of the Knights Templar at BookDepository.com (free shipping worldwide)

Legends of the Knights Templar (hardcover)

 

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